• When fixing food systems is about the hashtag

    Posted on Jan 21, 2019

    This post was written in part in response to some media fixation with an individual in what would appear to be an attempt to discredit an important conversation about the future of food. It was also written in part because EAT-Lancet Commission report is important and is worthy of investigation. It does raise a troubling question – who should be driving the food agenda?

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  • Food origins are not straightforward

    Posted on Jan 17, 2019

    In a much-publicised move, the President of the US served up fast food to a winning sports team. Putting aside the reason for the rather odd event there were several points of concern arising from the event. Disclaimer: we are not talking politics.

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  • Know your grower

    Posted on Jan 07, 2019

    A lot of disagreement, a lot of passion

    Subscribing to social media feed for agribusiness news takes a certain sort of stamina. Feeds bounce between cute videos of piglets to full-on battles between different farming philosophies and different consumer perspectives. What becomes very clear, very quickly, is that there is a lot of disagreement and, a lot of passion.

    If we consider that the core purpose of social media is to communicate, then it is an ideal platform for the sharing of ideologies, building followings and converting nay-sayers to our “better” way of thinking. It seems, however,...

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  • What's the story with dory? Fish fraud persists

    Posted on Dec 16, 2018

    Some years ago, I attended a conference in Malaysia. I remember one fascinating presentation describing how fish were caught near Singapore and then sent to another country for processing. The fish fillets that returned from processing had a different DNA profile than the fish that left. Interesting. One of two things were happening: it was either magic or fraud. My money is on fraud, and, coincidentally, money is the main driver behind all types of food fraud.

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  • The most wasteful time of year

    Posted on Dec 12, 2018

    Is it time to revisit our traditions if those traditions are now punctuated by unsustainable food related behaviours?

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  • Festive season food waste - animated

    Posted on Dec 12, 2018

    By the numbers it would seem that the festive season is also the wasteful season. Is it time to rethink how we celebrate?

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  • Will science save us? Part 1

    Posted on Dec 10, 2018

    Returning from the final EU Food Integrity conference - a meeting of thought leaders in the world of scientific methods to combat food fraud - I must confess to a feeling of Deja vu. I have been here before and listened to several the same scientists (all of whom I greatly respected). I sat in similar darkened auditoriums and wandered around other poster sessions brimming with complex diagrams, details and data; navigated trade displays from leading scientific providers; and networked with friends and colleagues, regulators and providers. On previous occasions, as with this one, we all had a common purpose – a desire to make food supply chains safer.

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  • Mission (im)possible

    Posted on Dec 06, 2018

    The terms ‘food authenticity’ and ‘food integrity’ are bandied around a lot (particularly by those working to support food supply chains) and the state of ‘integrity’ has become something like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. We can see the rainbow (problem) but can never get to the desired outcome (food integrity), or that’s how it seems, at least.

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  • A New Food Model

    Posted on Dec 03, 2018

    Writing about another Nigella, or a new form of food fusion, could be quite the way to grab the attention of those interested in food systems. Sadly, however, this post is about a new theory of the relationship between all things food; and where those relationships overlap and compete.

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  • Air(plain) Food

    Posted on Nov 21, 2018

    Nearly 100 years ago, the first inflight meal was served – for 3 shillings (around £6 in 2018 terms). Passengers aboard a London-to-Paris flight could purchase a pre-packed lunch, consisting of a sandwich and fruit. Fast forward to today and some airlines still offer the ability to purchase pre-packed lunches (although add in a considerable amount of packaging) but there are also other meals available that are optimistically described as ‘gourmet’ by airline marketing departments.

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